Mildred’s Temple Kitchen owner Donna Dooher’s five essential kitchen items

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Pantry Raid: Mildred’s Temple Kitchen owner Donna Dooher’s five essential kitchen items

We’re asking chefs to peer into their pantries and tell us their top shelf-stable essentials. Here are six staples that Mildred’s Temple Kitchen owner Donna Dooher made sure to stock up on before we went into lockdown.

Prepared mustard

What kind: Koslik’s Lime & Honey and Classic Dijon
Where she bought it: Rowe Farms
What she does with it: “It’s wonderful for mixing into chicken and egg salad for sandwiches, or to slather onto burgers. It’s also a great addition to salad dressings and marinades.”

Concentrated paste

What kind: Entube
Where she bought it: The Spice Trader
What she does with it: “The tube design is so handy; just squeeze out a small amount for an instant flavour boost! I use the curry paste in Indian sauces, and the harissa in tomato sauces that need some heat. And for coconut-based sauces, I use both.”

Hot sauce

What kind: Mildred’s Red Hot Chili Peppers
Where she bought it: Mildred’s Temple Kitchen
What she does with it: “I mix it up with some maple syrup—my go-to is from Lanark County—and then rub it on pork ribs before barbecuing them. It’s so easy and delish!”

Couscous

What kind: Moroccan couscous
Where she bought it: Alimentari Italian Grocery
What she does with it: “It’s an easy starch to whip up for hearty stews. It’s also great as a side dish on its own, or as an addition to a leafy green salad.”

Spice blends

What kinds: Ras el hanout, berbere and black salt
Where she bought them: The Spice Trader
What she does with them: “I mix the ras el hanout into hot clarified butter, then toss it all with cauliflower florets before roasting in a hot oven. The cauliflower comes out so flavourful that it can be considered a meal in itself. The Ethiopian berbere spice blend is so full of flavour; it offers both a textural boost and hit of heat. I sprinkle it on flatbreads, hummus and roasted red peppers. As for black salt, I use it to season secondary cuts of meat—things like pork shoulder and beef brisket. I also like using it for brines, and it’s great as a rub for duck confit, too.”